1000 resultados para Pediatric Rheumatology


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Objective. To use the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO) core set of outcome measures to develop a validated definition of improvement for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries, each of whom had specific experience in the assessment of juvenile SLE patients, achieved consensus on 128 patient profiles as being clinically improved or not improved. Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the gold standard measure, the chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and false-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa level of agreement for 597 candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Only definitions with a kappa value greater than 0.7 were retained. The top definitions were selected based on the product of the content validity score multiplied by its kappa statistic.Results. The definition of improvement with the highest final score was at least 50% improvement from baseline in any 2 of the 5 core set measures, with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%.Conclusion. PRINTO proposes a valid and reproducible definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians and that incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set measures in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in patients with juvenile SLE. The definition is now proposed for use in juvenile SLE clinical trials and may help physicians to decide whether a child with SLE responded adequately to therapy.

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Objective. To investigate the proxy-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its determinants in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).Methods. In this multinational, multicenter, cross-sectional study, HRQOL of patients with JIA was assessed through the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) and was compared with that of healthy children of similar age from the same geographic area. of joint inflammation, Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate.Results. A total of 6,639 participants (3,324 with JIA and 3,315 healthy) were enrolled from 32 countries. The mean SD physical and psychosocial summary scores of the CHQ were significantly lower in patients with JIA than in healthy children (physical: 44.5 +/- 10.6 versus 54.6 +/- 4.0, P < 0.0001; psychosocial: 47.6 +/- 8.7 versus 51.9 +/- 7.59 P < 0.0001), with the physical well-being domain being most impaired. Patients with persistent oligoarthritis had better HRQOL compared with other subtypes, whereas HRQOL was similar across patients with systemic arthritis, polyarthritis, and extended oligoarthritis. A CHAQ score > 1 and a pain intensity rating > 3.4 cm on a 10-cm visual analog scale were the strongest determinants of poorer HRQOL in the physical and psychosocial domains, respectively.Conclusion. We found that patients with JIA have a significant impairment of their HRQOL compared with healthy peers, particularly in the physical domain. Physical well-being was mostly affected by the level of functional impairment, whereas the intensity of pain had the greatest influence on psychosocial health.

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OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to obtain data on the association of antiphospholipid antibodies with clinical manifestations in childhood and to enable future studies to determine the impact of treatment and long-term outcome of pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome.PATIENTS and METHODS. A European registry extended internationally of pediatric patients with antiphospholipid syndrome was established as a collaborative project of the European Antiphospholipid Antibodies Forum and Lupus Working Group of the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society. To be eligible for enrollment the patient must meet the preliminary criteria for the classification of pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome and the onset of antiphospholipid syndrome must have occurred before the patient's 18th birthday.RESULTS. As of December 1, 2007, there were 121 confirmed antiphospholipid syndrome cases registered from 14 countries. Fifty-six patients were male, and 65 were female, with a mean age at the onset of antiphospholipid syndrome of 10.7 years. Sixty (49.5%) patients had underlying autoimmune disease. Venous thrombosis occurred in 72 (60%), arterial thrombosis in 39 (32%), small-vessel thrombosis in 7 (6%), and mixed arterial and venous thrombosis in 3 (2%). Associated nonthrombotic clinical manifestations included hematologic manifestations (38%), skin disorders (18%), and nonthrombotic neurologic manifestations (16%). Laboratory investigations revealed positive anticardiolipin antibodies in 81% of the patients, anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies in 67%, and lupus anticoagulant in 72%. Comparisons between different subgroups revealed that patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome were younger and had a higher frequency of arterial thrombotic events, whereas patients with antiphospholipid syndrome associated with underlying autoimmune disease were older and had a higher frequency of venous thrombotic events associated with hematologic and skin manifestations.CONCLUSIONS. Clinical and laboratory characterization of patients with pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome implies some important differences between antiphospholipid syndrome in pediatric and adult populations. Comparisons between children with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and antiphospholipid syndrome associated with autoimmune disease have revealed certain differences that suggest 2 distinct subgroups. Pediatrics 2008; 122: e1100-e1107

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Background: Rheumatic diseases in children are associated with significant morbidity and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). There is no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scale available specifically for children with less common rheumatic diseases. These diseases share several features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) such as their chronic episodic nature, multi-systemic involvement, and the need for immunosuppressive medications. HRQOL scale developed for pediatric SLE will likely be applicable to children with systemic inflammatory diseases.Findings: We adapted Simple Measure of Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters (SMILEY (c)) to Simple Measure of Impact of Illness in Youngsters (SMILY (c)-Illness) and had it reviewed by pediatric rheumatologists for its appropriateness and cultural suitability. We tested SMILY (c)-Illness in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases and then translated it into 28 languages. Nineteen children (79% female, n= 15) and 17 parents participated. The mean age was 12 +/- 4 years, with median disease duration of 21 months (1-172 months). We translated SMILY (c)-Illness into the following 28 languages: Danish, Dutch, French (France), English (UK), German (Germany), German (Austria), German (Switzerland), Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese (Brazil), Slovene, Spanish (USA and Puerto Rico), Spanish (Spain), Spanish (Argentina), Spanish (Mexico), Spanish (Venezuela), Turkish, Afrikaans, Arabic (Saudi Arabia), Arabic (Egypt), Czech, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Japanese, Romanian, Serbian and Xhosa.Conclusion: SMILY (c)-Illness is a brief, easy to administer and score HRQOL scale for children with systemic rheumatic diseases. It is suitable for use across different age groups and literacy levels. SMILY (c)-Illness with its available translations may be used as useful adjuncts to clinical practice and research.

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Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)

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Objective. To describe the clinical and laboratory features of macrophage activation syndrome as a complication of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods. Cases of juvenile SLE-associated macrophage activation syndrome were provided by investigators belonging to 3 pediatric rheumatology networks or were found in the literature. Patients who had evidence of macrophage hemophagocytosis on bone marrow aspiration were considered to have definite macrophage activation syndrome, and those who did not have such evidence were considered to have probable macrophage activation syndrome. Clinical and laboratory findings in patients with macrophage activation syndrome were contrasted with those of 2 control groups composed of patients with active juvenile SLE without macrophage activation syndrome. The ability of each feature to discriminate macrophage activation syndrome from active disease was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve.Results. The study included 38 patients (20 with definite macrophage activation syndrome and 18 with probable macrophage activation syndrome). Patients with definite and probable macrophage activation syndrome were comparable with regard to all clinical and laboratory features of the syndrome, except for a greater frequency of lymphadenopathy, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in patients with definite macrophage activation syndrome. Overall, clinical features had better specificity than sensitivity, except for fever, which was highly sensitive but had low specificity. Among laboratory features, the best sensitivity and specificity was achieved using hyperferritinemia, followed by increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Based on the results of statistical analysis, preliminary diagnostic guidelines for macrophage activation syndrome in juvenile SLE were developed.Conclusion. Our findings indicate that the occurrence of unexplained fever and cytopenia, when associated with hyperferritinemia, in a patient with juvenile SLE should raise the suspicion of macrophage activation syndrome. We propose preliminary guidelines for this syndrome in juvenile SLE to facilitate timely diagnosis and correct classification of patients.

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INTRODUÇÃO/OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a prática clínica com relação à verificação do cartão vacinal e à indicação de vacinas específicas em pacientes com doenças reumáticas pediátricas em uso de diferentes drogas, e evidenciar a possível associação entre frequência de vacinação e tempo de prática clínica dos reumatologistas pediátricos do estado de São Paulo. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Um questionário foi enviado para os reumatologistas pediátricos do Departamento de Reumatologia da Sociedade de Pediatra de São Paulo. Esse instrumento incluiu questões sobre tempo de prática em Reumatologia Pediátrica, vacinação de pacientes com Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico Juvenil (LESJ), artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ), dermatomiosite juvenil (DMJ) e imunização de acordo com os tratamentos utilizados. RESULTADOS: Cartão de vacinação foi visto por 100% dos profissionais na primeira consulta e por 36% anualmente. Vacinas de agentes vivos não foram recomendadas para pacientes com LESJ, AIJ e DMJ em 44%, 64% e 48%, respectivamente. Os profissionais foram divididos em dois grupos: A (< 15 anos de prática, n = 12) e B (> 16 anos, n = 13). Nenhuma diferença estatística foi observada no uso de vacinas de agentes vivos e vacinas de agentes inativos ou componentes proteicos em relação ao tratamento nos dois grupos (P > 0,05). Além disso, os grupos foram similares em relação à opinião sobre a gravidade de imunossupressão em pacientes com LESJ, AIJ e DMJ com ou sem atividade e a terapêutica utilizada (P > 0,05). CONCLUSÕES: A frequência de vacinação por reumatologistas pediátricos de São Paulo é baixa, especialmente após a primeira consulta, e não é influenciada pelo tempo de prática profissional.

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Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)

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Pancreatitis is a rare and a life-threatening SLE manifestation in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (c-SLE). The objective of this study was to systematically classify pancreatitis in c-SLE according to the International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis (INSPPIRE) and determine the overall prevalence, clinical features, laboratory and first episode outcomes. A multicenter cohort study in 10 Pediatric Rheumatology centers, including 852 cSLE patients. Pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22/852 (2.6%) cSLE patients. It was classified as acute pancreatitis in 20 (91%), acute recurrent pancreatitis in 2 (9%) and none of them had chronic pancreatitis. None of them had gallstones, traumatic pancreatitis or reported alcohol/tobacco use. The comparison of patients with pancreatitis (first episode) and without this complication revealed a shorter disease duration [1(0-10) vs. 4(0-23) years, p < 0.0001] and higher median of SLEDAI-2K [21(0-41) vs. 2(0-45), p < 0.0001]. The frequencies of fever (p < 0.0001), weight loss (p < 0.0001), serositis (p < 0.0001), nephritis (p < 0.0001), arterial hypertension (p < 0.0001), acute renal failure (p < 0.0001), macrophage activation syndrome (p < 0.0001) and death (p = 0.001) were also higher in patients with pancreatitis. The frequencies of intravenous methylprednisolone use (p < 0.0001) and the median of prednisone dose [55(15-60) vs. 11(1-90)mg/day, p < 0.0001] were significantly higher in patients with pancreatitis. Of note, the two patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis had two episodes, with pain-free interval of 1 and 4 years. This was the first study characterizing pancreatitis using the INSPPIRE standardized definitions in patients with cSLE showing that the predominant form is acute pancreatitis seen in association with glucocorticoid treatment and active severe disease.

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Introduction: Lupus erythematosus panniculitis (LEP) or lupus erythematosus profundus is a rare form of chronic cutaneous manifestation affecting both adults and pediatric patients. The prevalence of this manifestation was seldom reported in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). Case reports: From January 1983 to December 2010, 5,506 patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of our University Hospital and 278 (5%) of them met the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for JSLE. Two (0.7%) of them had LEP at JSLE onset. These two cases had tender deep inflammatory subcutaneous nodules or plaques at the time of diagnosis, and the histopathologic pattern evidenced lobular or mixed panniculitis with lymphocytic inflammatory cells of the fat lobule. Treatments for LEP included mainly antimalarials, systemic corticosteroids and sunscreen protection. One male patient required thalidomide and immunosuppressive drugs, including mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporin and intravenous cyclophosphamide. However, skin lesions improved only after rituximab treatment. Discussion: LEP was rarely observed in our cohort of JSLE patients as the first lupus manifestation. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy may be an option for refractory LEP treatment in children.

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Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common vasculitis in childhood. To the authors' knowledge, only one case of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE)-like onset mimicking KD and another case of KD and JSLE association have previously been described. However, the prevalence of this association of the two diseases was not reported. Therefore, over 27 consecutive years, 5419 patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit and 271 (5%) of them met the ACR classification criteria for JSLE. Two (0.7%) of them were female. These also had KD according to European League against Rheumatism / Paediatric Rheumatology European Society (EULAR/PReS) consensus criteria and are described in this report. One case was a 13-year-old who presented all six KD criteria. Echocardiogram showed pericardial effusion, dilatation and tortuosity of right and left coronary, and her symptoms promptly improved after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Lupus diagnosis was established a few days later. Another case was a 4-year-old who had also met all six KD criteria, with improvement after IVIG, and lupus diagnosis was made 1 year later. In conclusion, the frequency of the association between these two autoimmune diseases was rare. The occurrence of a second autoimmune systemic disease in a patient with a history of KD should also be considered. Furthermore, the initial presentation of lupus may mimic KD. Lupus (2012) 21, 89-92.

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Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients.